Oasis Of Two Scimitars

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 Kitchen Items of Gor

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raychel-SG
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Join date : 2012-12-07
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PostSubject: Kitchen Items of Gor   Tue Apr 02, 2013 1:58 pm

Servery Description

"There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks, numerous canisters of flour, sugars, and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments. Two large wine jugs stood in one corner of the room. There were many closed pantries lining the walls, and a number of pumps and tubs on one side. Some boxes and baskets of hard fruit were stored there. I could see the bread ovens in one wall, the long fire pit over which could be put cooking racks, the mountings for spits and kettle hooks; the fire pit was mostly black now, but here and there I could see a few broken sticks of glowing charcoal, aside from this, the light in the room came from one small thalarion oil lamp hanging from the ceiling..."
Assassin of Gor, pages 271-272


In the hall was a open circle of small tables, at which a handful of guests, on cushions and mats, reclined. There were four men and two women at these tables, other than the Lady Florence, the hostess, and her guest of the past several days, the Lady Metpomene. The tables were covered with cloths of glistening white and a service of gold. Before each guest there were tiny slices of tospit and larma, small pastries, and in a tiny golden cup, with a small golden spoon, the clustered, black, tiny eggs of the white grunt. The first wine, a light white wine, was being deferentially served by Pamela and Bonnie.
---Fighting Slave of Gor, pp 275-276

*NOTE:

The writings of Norman teach the reader that although botas are commonly used to store drinking supplies in times of travel, so are gourds and flagons. In everyday use thought, most brews come in kegs, other beverages come in bottles, and are stored in these bottles until ready to serve or warm, if appropriate, in brewing pots for mixing (such as for Kal-da) or simply large kettles for heating (as for Paga or Mead). Wine it would seem, is heated in single servings, at the time of the request for it. The serving of heated wine is explicitly in the "serving" page.

Serving of brewed or heated drinks, is done by either filling the vessel from the brewing pot or kettle directly, by sinking the serving vessel to the pot or ladling... or carried to Masters in a serving tankard.

Serving of wine or other unheated drinks, would also be done by filling single vessels or bringing the bottle itself, in a sling type carrier, to the tables.

The vessels used for the different drinks are not quite as specific as some would like to think. Norman shows Ale served in tankards, Mead in horns, wine in goblets... and Paga served in about any possible vessel available, from drinking it directly from the bota to the use of stone encrusted goblets. There seems to be consistency in the fact that hot drinks are served in bowls however, with the exception of course, of blackwine, tea and hot chocolate... for those, cups are mentioned.




*Cooking Racks

"She built up the fire. I watched her. She unfolded and adjusted a single-bar cooking rack, placing it over the fire. From this she suspended a kettle of water. The single bar, which may be loosened in its rings, and has a handle, may also function as a spit."
Renegades of Gor, page 150


"Before the feast I had helped the women, cleaning fish and dressing marsh gants, and then, later, turning spits for the roasted tarsks, roasted over rence-root fires, kept on metal pans, elevated above the rence of the islands by metal racks, themselves resting on larger pans."
Raiders of Gor, page 44



*Ice Storage

"My house, incidentally, like most Gorean houses, had no ice chest. There is little cold storage on Gor. Generally food is preserved by being dried or salted. Some cold storage, of course, does exist. Ice is cut from ponds in the winter, and then stored in ice houses, under sawdust. One may go to the ice houses for it, or have it delivered in ice wagons. Most Goreans, of course, cannot afford the luxury of ice in the summer."
Guardsman of Gor, page 295



*Paga Taverns

From where she knelt she could see the low hanging tharlarion oil lamps of the main portion of the paga tavern, the men, the girls in silk who, in a moment, belled, would move among them, replenishing the paga. In the center of the tables, under a hanging lamp, there was a square area, recessed, filled with sand, in which men might fight or girls dance. Beyond the area of the sand and the many tables there was a high wall, some forty feet or so high, in which there were four levels, each containing seven small curtained alcoves, the entrances to which were circular, with a diameter of about twenty four inches. Seven narrow ladders, each about eight inches in width, fixed into the wall, gave access to these alcoves.
Assassins of Gor pg8-9



At a gesture from the proprietor, the grimy man in the tunic of white and gold, one of the serving slaves, with a flash of her ankle bells, hurried to the Assassin and set before him a bowl, which she trembling filled from the flask held over her right forearm.
Assassins of Gor pg8-9



She was then conducted top the small side door, through which the paga attendant had emerged. Beyond it , I gathered , would lie such things as the kitchens, the offices, the cellar's and pantries, the storage rooms, the dressing rooms, the
discipline chamber and the kennels.
Rogue of Gor 15 pg. 22



The men who had come into the tavern were roistering but order, to some extent, had been restored. Two of the ship's lanterns had been broken. There was glass, and spilled paga about, and two broken tables. but the musicians were again playing and again, in the square of sand, the girl performed, though not now the Whip Dance. Nude slave girls, wrists chained, hurried about. The proprietor, sweating, aproned, was tipping yet another great bottle of paga in its sling, filling cups, that they might be borne to the drinkers. There was an occasional scream from the alcoves, bringing laughter from the tables. I heard the flash of a whip somewhere, and the cries of a girl.
Raiders of Gor pg105



"`Paga!' called the standing man. `Paga!' A blonde girl, nude, with a string of pearls wound about her steel collar, ran to the table and, from the bronze vessel, on its strap, about her shoulder, poured paga into the goblet before the seated man. The fellow who stood by the table, scarcely noticing the girl, placed a tarsk-bit in her mouth, and she fled back to the counter where, under the eye of a paga attendant, she spit the coin into a copper bowl.
Rogue of Gor. p 77



*Amphora

two handled narrow necked vessel with a pointed base it is commonly buried overnight in the earth with only it's neck left above the surface; to cool certain beverages
Mercenaries of Gor, page 257


*Animal horn

Mead the preferred beverage of the northland, made with fermented honey, water and spice, traditionally served in a large animal horn.
Marauders of Gor, Pages 78, 89 and 90


*Baskets

Made of various materials including reeds and grasses, they may be covered with a lid and are used for the storage of anything from fruits and vegetables, to sealed containers of fine spices and condiments that are rarely used and prized.

"I stepped aside to let a young girl pass, who carried two baskets of eggs, those of the migratory arctic gant. They nest in the mountaim of the Hrimgar and in steep, rocky outcroppings, called bird cliffs, found here and there jutting out of the tundra. The bird cliffs doubtless bear some geological relation to the Hrimgar chains. When such eggs are frozen they are eaten like apples."
Beasts of Gor, page 196

I had also been used to carry heavy kettles of rence beer from the various islands to the place of feasting, as well as strings of water gourds, poles of fish, plucked gants, slaughtered tarsks, and baskets of the pith of rence.
Raiders of Gor, page 41

She had been carrying a wicker basket containing vulos, a domesticated pigeon raised for eggs and meat
Nomads of Gor, p 1





*Bota

A bag with a cork usually of verr-skin, also called skin-bag. Used to transport or serve liquids such as water and paga. Common in Kamps, where some are kept in the chillery with paga, water, or milk and others lie tethered in the river for cold drinks, or hung near the fire for warmed paga.

a bag with a reclosable stopper or cork commonly made of verrskin leather; used to transport liquids and is often utilized by serving slave girls especially in the camps
Book 7: Captive of Gor, page 112
Book 10: Tribesman of Gor, page 36
Book 22: Dancer of Gor, pages 428 and 429

He leaned over and tossed me a skin bag of Paga
Tarnsman of Gor, p 78

"He signaled to a boy who carried a skin of Ka-la-na wine over his shoulder. He took the skin of wine from the boy and bit out the horn plug; he then, with the wineskin on his shoulder, held back the head of Elizabeth Cardwell with one hand and with the other shoved the bone nozzle of the skin between her teeth; he tipped the skin and the girl, half choking, swallowed wine; some of the red fluid ran from her mouth and over her body."
Nomads of Gor page 39-40.



*Bottles

Made of clay or glass that is topped with a cork or sometimes sealed with wax. Frequently used in cities, but in camps, glass is only for the more rare drinks such as various wines or liquors.

... to the proprietor of the paga tavern, and took in return one of the huge bottles of paga, of the sort you put in a pouring sling...
Raiders of Gor, p 111


The beast returned from the cabinet with two glasses and a bottle.
Beasts of Gor, p 371

'A small bottle,' I said, 'of the Slave Gardens of Anesidemus.'
'I have heard that it is a marvellous ka-la-na.' said the free woman, her eyes alight.
'So too, have I,' I said.
'It is very expensive,' said the woman.
'Are you familiar with it?' I asked.
'Oh,' she said lightly, 'I have had it a few times.'

... 'Oh, it is marvellous ka-la-na,' she purred. I gathered that she had never before had such ka-la-na. True, it might run the buyer as much as three copper tarsks, a price for which some women can be purchased.
Mercenaries of Gor, 25:345

First from the kitchen, bearing her tray, came the voluptuous slave of Aemilianuus. Behind her, too with her tray, came the little dark-haired slave. In a moment both were deferentially serving. The collared softness of the dark-haired girl well set off the the metal of the tray, and the small multicolored glasses and bottles upon it.
Guardsman of Gor, p 254



*Blackwyne Vessels

The two slaves, their chains removed, now returned, and began to serve the black wine. The voluptuous slave of Aemilianus, whom he had not yet named, placed the tiny silver cups, on small stands, before us. The lovely little slave in bluish gauze, whom he had not yet named, holding the narrow spouted, silver pouring vessel in a heavy cloth, to retain its heat and protect her hands, poured the scalding, steaming black fluid, in narrow, tiny streams, into the small cups. She poured into the cups only the amount that would be compatible with the assorted sugars and creams which the guest might desire, if any, these being added in, and stirred, if, and as, pertinent, by Aemilianus` slave, who directed the serving.
Guardsman of Gor pg. 244


*Bowls (*small, wooden, large, clay, copper)

"The slender blond girl, who had been giving men water from the skin bag, was now given the work of filling small bowls from the large wooden bowl, for the bond-maids. She used a bronze ladle...The girls, including the slender blondish girl, emptied their bowls, even to licking them, that no grain be left..."
Marauders of Gor, pages 64-65


I had heard of black wine, but had never had any. It is drunk in Thentis, but I had never heard of it being much drunk in other Gorean cities...Then I picked up one of the thick, heavy clay bowls...It was extremely strong, and bitter, but it was hot, and, unmistakably, it was coffee.
Assassins of Gor, p 106

Too, I had brought up a small bowl of powdered bosk milk. We had finished the creams last night and, in any event, it was unlikely they would have lasted the night. If I had wanted creams I would have had to have gone to the market.
Guardsman of Gor, p 295


I turned and, among the furnishings of the tent, found a bottle of Ka-la-na, of good vintage, from the vineyards of Ar, the loot of a caravan raid. I then took the wine, with a small copper bowl, and a black, red-rimmed wine crater, to the side of the fire.
Captive of Gor. p 331


*Brazier

A small heating unit with a round pan suspended on a frame over a small flame used to heat liquids slowly. Used for kalana when served mulled with spices, it may also be placed onto the heating stones as the heat from the stones is not directly upon the metal.

“Four members of the Council Guard, beneath the two great braziers set at the entrance, leaped to attention, the butts of their pikes striking on the tiles.”
Raiders of Gor - Page 255

"I decided I might care to taste the steaming black wine. I lifted my finger. The girl in whose charge was the silver vessel, filled with black wine, knelt beside a tiny brazier, on which it sat, retaining it's warmth. She rose swiftly to her feet. She knelt, head down, before me. She poured carefully, the hot, black beverage into the tiny red cup. I dismissed her."
Guardsman of Gor, page 244-245





*Buckets

Made of wood or leather, it is used to gather and haul assorted substances such as water or fruits.

"A guard was with us, and we were charged with filling our leather buckets with ram-berries, a small reddish fruit with edible seeds, not unlike plums save for the many small seeds."
Captive of Gor, page 305




*Canisters

Usually of clay or metal, they are covered vessels used for the storing of sugars, flour, or blackwyne beans. They are well sealed to prevent the contents from getting damp or soiled.

"There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; numerous canisters of flour, sugars, and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments.
Assassins of GOR, page 271-272

...There was no lock on the door and thus I could come and go as I pleased. Inside the cube there were canisters of Mul-Fungus, a bowl, a ladle, a wooden-bladed Fungus-Knife; a wooden headed Fungus-Mallet; a convenient tube of Mul-Pellets, which discharged its contents one at a time following my depressing a lever in the bottom of the tube; and a large, inverted jar of water, by means of which an attached, somewhat shallow, watering pan was kept filled."
Priest-Kings of Gor, Pg. 111





*Copper kettle

Made of various metals and used to heat liquids such as blackwyne, which is brewed in the kettle, or hot water for bazi tea.


"Is it ready?" I asked. I looked at the tiny copper kettle on the small stand. A tiny kaiila-dung fire burned under it. A small, heavy, curved glass was nearby, on a flat box, which would hold some two ounces of the tea. Bazi tea is drunk in tiny glasses, usually three at a time. carefully measured.


*Crater

A bowl resting upon a stem with small handles for serving wines, especially if the vessel is to be shared.

I turned and, among the furnishings of the tent, found a bottle of Ka-la-na, of good vintage, from the vineyards of Ar, the loot of a caravan raid. I then took the wine, with a small copper bowl, and a black, red-rimmed wine crater, to the side of the fire.
Captive of Gor. p 331

Marlenus snapped his fingers, pointing to his cup on the table. The slave girl came forward, from where she knelt to one side, and, kneeling, from a two-handled vessel, filled it. She was very beautiful. "I, too, shall have wine," I said.
Hunters of Gor page 149.

"He then indicated that she should again kneel to one side, and take up the two-handled wine vessel, that she be ready, when we wished, to serve us once more." Hunters of Gor page 153.



*Cups

Samos put down a cup of paga.
Raiders of Gor, p 306

"But that sort of thing is behind me now," she said to me, throwing back her head and quaffing deeply of the ruby-red Ka-la-na in her cup.
Rogue of Gor, 20

"It was my loss," smiled Ibn Saran, lifting to his lips a tiny, steaming cup of black wine.
Tribesmen of Gor page 88.

My Master extended his cup to me, and I, kneeling, filled it with Sul paga. I pressed my lips to the cup, and handed it to him. My eyes smarted. I almost felt drunk from the fumes.
Slave Girl of Gor. p 134

She picked up the small tray from the stand near the table. On it was the small vessel containing a thick, sweet liquer from distant Turia, the Ar of the south, and the two tiny glasses from which we had sipped it. On the tray, too, was the metal vessel which had contained the black wine, steaming and bitter, from far Thentis, famed for its tarn flocks, the small yellow-enameled cups from which we had drunk the black wine, its spoons and sugars, a tiny bowl of mint sticks, and the softened, dampened cloths on which we had wiped our fingers.
Explorers of Gor, page 10


*Flagon-gourd

A hollowed gourd dried and sealed to drink from. It would resemble a dried out pumpkin or squash.

When the meat was ready, Kamchak ate his fill, and drank down, too, a flagon of bosk milk
Nomads of Gor, p 139

"I had carried about bowls of cut, fried fish, and wooden trays of roated tarsk meat, and roasted gants, threaded on sticks, and rence cakes and porridges, and gourd flagons, many times replenished, of rence beer."
Raiders Gor, page 44


*Flask

A container with a cork used for carrying small amounts, held on the person in a pouch or pocket, frequently for liquor.

I went to his locker near the mat and got out his Ka-la-na flask, taking a long draught myself and then shoving it into his hands. He drained the flask in one drink and wiped his hand across his beard, stained with the red juice of the fermented drink.
Tarnsman of Gor pg. 168



*Glasses

Cylinders of varying heights made of varying materials such as clay or glass with no handles.

I looked at the tiny copper kettle on the small stand. A tiny kaiila dung fire burned under it. A small, heavy, curved glass was nearby, on a flat box, which would hold some two ounces of the tea. Bazi tea is drunk in tiny glasses, usually three at a time, carefully measured. She did not make herself tea, of course... She lifted the kettle from the fire and, carefully, poured me a tiny glass of tea.
Tribesmen of Gor, p 139

The beast returned from the cabinet with two glasses and a bottle.
Beasts of Gor, p 371

"She lifted the kettle from the fire and, carefully, poured me a tiny glass of tea." Tribesmen of Gor page 141.



*Goblet

A vessel in standard wine-glass form of a footed bowl with varying dimensions. It may be made of silver or other metals, wood, or even clay. Usually decorated in some way through engraving or carving and or color, some even have small gems set into them. They come in a large variety of sizes, from the tiny goblets for Turian wines, to the larger goblets used for paga or kalana.


"The girl who had gone to fetch my paga now returned and knelt before the table. She kissed the goblet, and then, her head down, between her extended arms, proffered it to me.
Vagabonds of Gor pg.401


"My hand clenched on the metal goblet. The wine moved in the vessel."
Tarnsman of Gor page 30.

"I thrust out the silver paga goblet, studded with rubies, and Telima, standing beside my thronelike chair, filled it. I did not look upon her."
Raiders of Gor page 223.


"Then, suddenly, as I was to hand it to him, I boldly, again, lifted the GOBLETS SIDE to my lips. Holding it in both hands, I kissed it again, lovingly, delicately, fully, lingeringly, my eyes closed."
Slave Girl of Gor, Pg. 68

Many civilians, I believe, do not know why certain warriors, by habit, request their paga in metal goblets when dining in public houses."
Renegades of Gor, p 77

`Your paga,' said the nude slave girl, who served me, her wrists chained. `It is warmed as you wished.' I took it from her, not even glancing upon her, and drained the goblet... I liked paga warm. One felt is so much the sooner that way.
Raiders of Gor, p 100




*Golden eating prong

an eating utensil used in Turia, it has a single tine.
Book 4: Nomads of Gor, page 83
Book 12: Beasts of Gor, page 21


The tables were covered with cloths of glistening white and a service of gold. Before each guest there were tiny slices of tospit and larma, small pastries, and in a tiny golden cup, with a small golden spoon, the clustered, black, tiny eggs of the white grunt. The first wine, a light white wine, was being deferentially served by Pamela and Bonnie."
Fighting Slave of Gor, pages 275-276

"I shot the spiced vulo brain into my mouth on the end of a golden eating prong, a utensil, as far as I knew, unique to Turia."
Nomads of Gor, page 84





*Horns

Made of bosk or tabuk horn, it is hollowed and usually carved with a design or pattern. Typically, a horn can be placed on a separate stand upon a stool or table, or it may have a stand attatched to it. Commonly however, it is strung onto a belt or saddle by a thong, or held in the hand until emptied.


"Here Jarl, said Thyri, again handing me the horn. It was filled with the mead of Torvaldsland, brewed from fermented, honey, thick and sweet."
Marauders of Gor, Pg 90

"I held up the large drinking horn of the north. 'There is no way for this to stand upright,' I said to him, puzzled. He threw back his head again and roared once more with laughter.
'If you cannot drain it,' he said, 'give it to another!'
I threw back my head and drained the horn."
Marauders of Gor, page 89



*Hydria

A tall sided bowl with handles made of clay or wood and usually used to dip warmed liquid from large kettles, then to be poured from as a girl serves several people at once.

described as a high handled water vessel, something similar is used by slave girls to dip paga from simmering kettles.
Book 24: Vagabonds of Gor, page 16


There were perhaps, a hundred men, within the enclosure, and some fifteen of twenty girls. The girls filled their vessels which, like the hydria, or water vessel, are high handled, for dipping in a large kettle hung simmering over a fire near the entrance to the enclosure. Warm paga makes one drunk quicker, it is thought. I usually do not like my paga heated, except sometimes on cold nights. this night was not cold , but warm. It was now late spring. Some Cosians tend to fond of hot paga so, too, are some of the folks in the more northern islands, interestingly, such as Hunjer and Skjern, west of Torvaldsland. this probably represents an influence from Cos, transmitted through merchants and seamen. In the north generally, mead, a drink made with fermented honey and water, and often spices and such, tends to be favored over paga.
Vagabonds of Gor pg16



*Iron Grills

The meat was a steak cut from the loin, a huge shaggy long horned bovine, meat is seared, as thick as the forearm of a Warrior on a small iron grill on a kindling of charcoal cylinders so that the thin margin on the outside was black, crisp and flaky sealed within by the touch of the fire-the blood rich flesh hot and fat with juice.
Outlaw of Gor, p 45



*Kantharos (footed bowls)

She knelt near the table... and put the paga, in a small kantharos
Renegades of Gor, p 71

kantharos (refered to through most of John Norman's writings simply as a 'footed bowl' and much used for the drinking of Paga and wine) Also spelled Cantharos, drinking cup in Attic Greek pottery from the period of the red-figure and black-figure styles. The kantharos is in the form of a deep cup, with loop-shaped handles arising from the bottom of the body and extending high above the brim. Usually made of clay or a more expensive metal.



*Ladle

Frequently made of metal, it is used to dip from a larger container such as a vat or tureen into a smaller one, such as a pitcher or drinking vessel.


" She used a bronze ladle...The girls, including the slender blondish girl, emptied their bowls, even to licking them, that no grain be left..."
Marauders of Gor, pages 64-65



*Metal pans (large pots)

A plate with sides that are usually made of metal. Sometimes it is the vessel the food was cooked in, much like a skillet.


"Before the feast I had helped the women, cleaning fish and dressing marsh gants, and then, later, turning spits for the roasted tarsks, roasted over rence-root fires, kept on metal pans, elevated above the rence of the islands by metal racks, themselves resting on larger pans."
Raiders of Gor, page 44

I had hardly settled myself behind the table when the proprietor had placed a large, fat pot of steaming Kal-da before me. It almost burned my hands to lift the pot. I took a long, burning swig of the brew and though, on another occasion, I might have thought it foul, tonight it sang through my body like the bubbling fire it was, a sizzling, brutal irritant that tasted so bad and yet charmed me so much I had to laugh.
Outlaw of Gor, p 78

Even the proprietor slept, his head across his folded arms on the counter, behind which stood the great Kal-da brewing pots, at last empty and cold.
Outlaw of Gor, p 80

Other girls now appeared among the tables, clad only in a camisk and a silver collar, and suddenly, silently, began to serve the Kal-da which Kron had ordered. Each carried a heavy pot of the foul, boiling brew and, cup by cup, replenished the cups of the men.
Outlaw of Gor, p 226

Soon I smelled the frying of vulo eggs in a large, flat pan, and the unmistakable odor of coffee, or as the Goreans express it, black wine.
Kajia of Gor. P 73



*Metal Rod/Skewer

Frequently used in taverns as a quick way to serve directly from the fire, or in Kamp where it is a convenient way to carry hot food from fire to patrol. A piece of meat is stabbed through and hung to roast, then can be placed directly on a plate from the fire with no further preparation or need for any other utensils.


"I had had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a Kort with melted cheese and nutmeg; hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine."
Tribesmen of Gor page 47-48.

"Many were the roast tarsk and roast bosk that had roasted over the long fire, on the iron spits. Splendid was the quality of the ale at the tables of the Blue Tooth..."
Marauders of Gor, page 191


"Before the feast I had helped the women, cleaning fish and dressing marsh gants, and then, later, turning spits for the roasted tarsks, roasted over rence-root fires, kept on metal pans, elevated above the rence of the islands by metal racks, themselves resting on larger pans."
Raiders of Gor, page 44

In the cafes I had feasted well. I had had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg; hot Bazi tea, sugared and later, Turian wine.
---Tribesmen of Gor, p 48



*Paga, drinking vessels

paga, the fermented drink made from Sa-Tarna grain seems to have no traditions surrounding it's service, as is demonstrated by the myriad variety of serving and drinking vessels deemed acceptable by the Gorean imbiber.

The following annotations list these examples of drinking vessels: cups, brass cups, glasses, bowls, goblets, metal goblets, a silver goblet studded with rubies, a golden goblet, and a kantharos
Book 5: Assassin of Gor, page 9
Book 6: Raiders of Gor, pages 102, 105, 111, 223 and 306
Book 9: Marauders of Gor, pages 22-23
Book 12: Beasts of Gor, page 371
Book 23: Renegades of Gor, page 71 and 77



*Paga, serving vessels

paga, the fermented drink made from Sa-Tarna grain, seems to have no traditions surrounding it's service, as is demonstrated by the myriad variety of serving and drinking vessels deemed acceptable by the Gorean imbiber.

The following annotations list these examples of serving vessels: wineskins or botas made from verrskin leather, bottles so large they must be supported by a shoulder sling, bronze vessels with a similar strap, a hydria or water vessel, as well as bottles, sealed with the insignia of the brewer. Paga is served from kettles, jugs and vats when not sealed in a large or standard sized bottle.
Book 6: Raiders of Gor, page 105, 111, 113, 120, and 171
Book 7: Captive of Gor, page 113
Book 8: Hunters of Gor, page 13
Book 12: Beasts of Gor, page 371
Book 24: Vagabonds of Gor, pages 16 and 36


"Paga!' called the standing man. "Paga!' A blonde girl, nude, with a string of pearls wound about her steel collar, ran to the table and, from the bronze vessel, on its strap, about her shoulder, poured paga into the goblet before the seated man. The fellow who stood by the table, scarcely noticing the girl, placed a tarsk-bit in her mouth, and she fled back to the counter where, under the eye of a paga attendant, she spit the coin into a copper bowl."
Rogue of Gor pg 78

In most taverns no bottle is brought to the table but the paga is brought to the table, by the paga slave, a cup at a time, the cups normally being filled from a vat behind the counter.
Explorers of Gor, p 158




*Parfleche

kailiauk hide is prepared in sheets, cut almost as thin as paper, dried in the prairie sun and layered to form a flat, leather envelope which is sealed with a seam of hardened fat. Used to store food, such as kailiauk meat.
Savages of Gor, page 328



*Pitcher

Usually made of clay or wood, it is used in Kamps to serve bosk milk with blackwyne or sauces such as gravies.

A girl in a tunic of white silk, gracefully, carrying a large pitcher of diluted Ka-la-na wine, approached our table from the rear, and climbed the stairs, delicately, and as though timidly, head down... I glanced at Virginia Kent, who was now moving about the tables, in the incredibly brief silken slave livery, the pitcher on her left shoulder, held there gracefully with her left hand.
Assassin of Gor page 186-187.




*Plates

A flat platter of varying materials.


"With a serving prong she placed narrow strips of roast bosk and fried sul on my plate."
Guardsman of Gor, page 234



*Pots

A large, round vessel much like a bowl that is usually the vessel a drink is warmed in and ladled out of.

"Even the proprietor slept, his head across his folded arms on the counter, behind which stood the great Kal-da brewing pots, at last empty and cold."
Outlaw of Gor page 80.

"Other girls now appeared among the tables, clad only in a camisk and a silver collar, and sullenly, silently, began to serve the Kal-da which Kron had ordered. Each carried a heavy pot of the foul, boiling brew and, cup by cup, replenished the cups of the men."
Outlaw of Gor page 226




*Rep cloth

rough fabric woven from the fibers of the rep plant.
Book 7: Captive of Gor, page 294


Bera went to the next man, to fill his cup with the mead, from the heavy hot tankard, gripped with cloth, which she carried.
---Marauders of Gor, p 78




*Serving prong

A combination of fork and spoon, or a " spork ", it is a round bowl with prongs to spear food. Made of various materials, but usually some kind of metal.


"With a serving prong, she placed narrow strips of roast bosk and fried sul on my plate."
Guardsman of Gor, page 234




*Skin bags

"The slender blond girl, who had been giving men water from the skin bag, was now given the work of filling small bowls from the large wooden bowl, for the bond-maids. ...."
Marauders of Gor, pages 64-65

"He came to me, bent over, tattered, swarthy, grinning up at me, the verrskin bag over his shoulder, the brass cups, a dozen of them, attached to shoulder straps and his belt, rattling and clinking...Without removing the bag from his shoulder, he filled the cup...the water flowed into the cup between a tiny vent-and-spigot device, which wastes little water, by reducing spillage, which was tied in and waxed into a hole in the front left foreleg of the verrskin. The skins are carefully stripped and any rents are sewed up, the seams coated with wax. When the whole skin is thoroughly cleaned of filth and hair, straps are fastened to it, so that i might be conveniently carried on the shoulders, or over the back..."
Tribesmen of Gor, page 36




*Spoons

Of various sizes and materials from the fine silver or gold used in bazi tea and Turian wine serves to larger wooden ones used to stir cooking stews and gruels.


With a tiny spoon, it's tip no more than a tenth of a hort in diameter, she placed four measures of white sugar, and six of yellow; with two stirring spoons, one for the white sugar, another for the yellow, she stirred the beverage after each measure."
Tribesmen of Gor, page 89




*Spoon --horn

A spoon made of horn.

"The horn spoon snapped in his hands, and he angrily threw the pieces into his bowl."
Assassin of Gor, page 120



*Tankard

A larger version of a mug, usually with two handles, and sometimes shared.


The Forkbeard himself now, from a wooden keg, poured a great tankard of ale, which must have been of the measure of five gallons - - - .
The tankard then, with two great bronze handles, was passed from hands to hands among the rowers. The men threw back their heads and, the liquid spilling down their bodies, drank ale. It was victory ale
From Marauders of Gor pg 99

Gorean Ale brought from earth early years. it is traditionally served in tankards or horns.
Marauders of Gor" Page 82-83 99,191,194



*Tea cups

Tea is extremely important to the nomads. It is served hot and heavily sugared. It gives them strength then, in virtue of the sugar, and cools the, by making them sweat as well as stimulating them. It is drunk three small cups at a time, carefully measured.
Tribesmen of Gor, pg 38



*Tray

Made of metal or wood, to carry several vessels during a serve.


"She carried a tray, on which were various spoons and sugars. She knelt, placing her tray upon the table.
Tribesmen of Gor, page 89

First from the kitchen, bearing her tray, came the voluptuous slave of Aemilianuus. Behind her, too with her tray, came the little dark-haired slave. In a moment both were deferentially serving. The collared softness of the dark-haired girl well set off the the metal of the tray, and the small multicolored glasses and bottles upon it.
Guardsman of Gor, p 254



*Troughs

Seems that slave girls mostly ate their gruel from troughs or from bowls, using their fingers. "I shared breakfast with Elizabeth who informed me that it was better than the porridge below in the trough in the feeding room for female staff slaves,..."
Assassin of Gor, pages 106-107



*Tureen

A serving vessel used for soups, stews, and gruels to be ladled from into the individual's eating vessel.

"'Bread, Master?' she asked.

She offered me a silver tray on which, hot and steaming, were wedges of Gorean bread, made from Sa-Tarna grain. It took one of them and, from the tureen, with the small silver dipper, both on the tray, poured hot butter on the bread.
Rogue of Gor, page 191




*Ulo
woman's knife of the Red Hunters. It has semicircular blade in a wooden handle which is not suitable for carving, but good for cutting meat and sinew.
Beasts of Gor, page 262



*Vat

A large, covered vessel for the storing of liquids such as bosk milk to keep the contents free of bugs or dirt. It is used to ferment milk curds, but it may also be placed within the chilling pit to keep milk fresh.

"Temione had now filled her paga vessel. She picked up a goblet from a rack near the vat. The shelving on the rack was of narrow wooden rods. The goblets are kept upside down on the rods. In this way, washed, they can drain and dry. This also affords them some protection from dust. I watched her carefully wipe the goblet. Woe to the slave who would dare to serve paga or wine in a dirty goblet!" -- Vagabonds Of Gor page 20.



*Water Bag

Utilized by the desert nomads, hung at each side of their kaiila, by which to carry and drink water.

"He put his hand on the bulging water bag, which hung behind the saddle, on the left side of the beast, balanced by another on the right. One drinks alternately from the bags, to maintain the weight distribution. Such weight, of course, slows the kaiila, but, in the desert, one must have much water."
Tribesmen of Gor page 132.

"She then went to one of the large, wooden, covered water buckets, roped to the deck, and in it submerged a water-skin. I heard the bubbling as the skin filled... I noted the blondish girl, the water bag now, wet and heavy, over her shoulder, going to the men of the Forkbeard, to offer them drink."
Marauders of Gor page 63.



*Wine crater

I turned and, among the furnishings of the tent, found a bottle of Ka-la-na, of good vintage, from the vineyards of Ar, the loot of a caravan raid. I then took the wine, with a small copper bowl, and a black, red-rimmed wine crater, to the side of the fire.
Captive of Gor. p 331
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